Wednesday, 29 May 2024

2020 New Rules Interpretations

A new season of USAV is underway and with it comes a new rulebook and several rule changes. In this article, we will highlight some of the key changes and points of emphasis. Whether you are a player, coach, or avid fan, this article will provide you with the essential information you need to know.

Scenario One: Jewelry in Junior Competition

Junior Player with Small Stud Earrings

In this scenario, a referee notices a junior player wearing small stud earrings during warmups and informs them that it is not allowed in junior competitions. However, there has been a significant rule change this season regarding jewelry for juniors. They are now permitted to wear certain types of jewelry, but with some restrictions. While small stud earrings, inner-ear piercings, string bracelets, and soft medical condition bracelets are now allowed, it is important to remain vigilant for any jewelry that could pose a risk to the players or their teammates. It’s worth noting that clubs may establish their own policies regarding jewelry. For a complete overview of the jewelry guidelines, we recommend referring to the official rulebook.

Scenario Two: Team Uniforms

Team with Players Wearing Different Bottoms

In this scenario, a team’s uniform consists of a jersey and spandex shorts. However, two players on the team are wearing pants that go below the knee. The referees inform the team that they must all be in either shorts or pants to comply with the rules. This season, there has been a modification to the rules regarding uniforms. Teams now have the option to wear pants, as long as they are below the knee. However, it is essential to note that all team members must be wearing the same type of bottoms. Mixing shorts and pants without a waiver from the USAV Indoor Rules Interpreter is not allowed. It is crucial to follow the manufacturer logo language and remember that the undergarment rules remain the same.

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Scenario Three: Protest Procedure

Players and Coach Discussing Protest

In this scenario, an 18s team sends their captain to the R1 to protest the application of a rule. However, the coach starts speaking instead of the captain. The protest committee corrects the coach, stating that only the captain can speak during the protest procedure. A new change this season allows coaches to act as the captain in protest or potential protest situations at any age level. This rule change aims to provide greater flexibility while ensuring that protests are handled appropriately. However, it is vital to remember that coaches may still be sanctioned if they display unsportsmanlike behavior. Additionally, anyone, including someone on the bench, may be carded at the end of a protest procedure if necessary. Coaches are required to send the captain first, and if necessary, the R1 may approach the coach at their bench. Lastly, it is important to note that only the R1 has the authority to accept or deny a protest.

Scenario Four: Player’s Hair and the Ball

Player's Hair Contacting the Ball

In this scenario, a player’s long ponytail makes contact with the ball before it lands out of bounds. The referees call a touch on the player from Team B. However, according to the rules, it is not considered a fault if a player’s loose hair makes contact with the ball or the net. The closer the ball gets to the player’s head, the more likely the hair will touch it. Referees should only call a touch if they are absolutely certain that the hair made contact. It is important to make consistent and fair decisions based on the rules.

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Scenario Five: Uniform Touches the Net

Player Landed with Jersey Touching the Net

In this scenario, a player from Team A jumps to block the ball, and as they are landing, their jersey touches the net. The referee calls a net fault on the player. It is important to note that the uniform is considered part of the player’s body. Therefore, if the uniform comes into contact with the net while playing the ball, it is considered a net fault. While officiating, it is essential to balance the art of ignoring minor contacts by the uniform with maintaining consistency in applying the rules. Teams cannot argue the amount of the touch if a net fault is called.

Scenario Six: Antenna Fault

Line Judge Signals Antenna Fault

In this scenario, during a rally, the line judge indicates that a player has contacted the antenna during their blocking action. The line judge waves their flag and points at the antenna. As an official, you have a few options depending on the situation. If you are uncertain about what the line judge is calling, you can acknowledge that you saw the signal but let play continue. Alternatively, if you are confident that something hit the antenna but are unsure what it was, you can immediately whistle to end the rally and later confirm with the line judge. The decision on how to proceed should be based on the confidence and experience of your line judges. After the rally is finished, you can collect all the necessary information before making a final decision.

FAQs

Q: Where can I find the complete USAV rulebook?
A: You can contact your region for a copy or download the rulebook from the official USAV website at Alpinetgheep.

Q: Can junior players wear any type of jewelry?
A: Juniors are now allowed to wear certain types of jewelry such as small stud earrings, inner-ear piercings, string bracelets, and soft medical condition bracelets. However, it is essential to remain aware of any potential risks associated with the jewelry. Clubs may also have their own policies regarding jewelry.

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Q: Can teams mix shorts and pants in their uniforms?
A: No, teams must ensure that all players are wearing the same type of bottoms, either shorts or pants. Mixing them without a waiver from the USAV Indoor Rules Interpreter is not permitted.

Q: Can coaches speak during the protest procedure?
A: Yes, coaches can act as the captain during the protest or potential protest situations for all age levels. However, coaches may still be subject to sanctions if they display unsportsmanlike behavior.

Q: Is it considered a fault if a player’s loose hair touches the ball or the net?
A: No, it is not considered a fault if a player’s loose hair contacts the ball or the net. Referees should only call a touch if they are certain that the hair made contact.

Q: What happens if a player’s uniform touches the net during play?
A: If a player’s uniform touches the net while playing the ball, it is considered a net fault. The uniform is considered part of the player’s body.

Q: What should I do if a line judge signals an antenna fault?
A: Depending on the situation, you can either acknowledge the signal and let play continue, or immediately whistle to end the rally and later confirm with the line judge. The decision should be based on your confidence in the line judge and the need for additional information.

As we navigate through the new USAV season, it is crucial to stay updated with the latest rule changes. Understanding these rules ensures fair play and enhances the overall experience for everyone involved. For the complete rulebook and any additional clarifications, please refer to Alpinetgheep website. Let’s embrace the new rules and have a fantastic season ahead!